Posts Tagged ‘Nordstrom’

DEPARTMENT STORES OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA – EMPORIUM – SAN FRANCISCO

Friday, March 11th, 2011

 

Emporium – Market Street – San Francisco – 1905 (pre earthquake)

THE EMPORIUM – SAN FRANCISCO – CALIFORNIA’S LARGEST AND AMERICA’S GRANDEST DEPARTMENT STORE…..

The Emporium in San Francisco was the first and later became the largest and for many years the most important department store in San Francisco. The store, because of its size and convenience to transportation, helped turn Market Street into a shopping Mecca. The store offered popular or value priced merchandise. It also had special events to draw customers such as band concerts every Saturday night under the glass dome.

The original store was started in 1872 as the Golden Rule Bazaar. At the time, it was the only large store on the West Coast and was designed to serve those following the gold rush. It grew to operate out of three different buildings. During those years the store was operated by the Davis brothers.

In 1893Adolph Feist leased a building on Market Street with plans to open a major department store through a partnership with one of the major retailers in the East. When the partnership strategy failed he rented out space in the building to various small entrepreneurs. In 1896, the doors opened under the name The Emporium. Soon after, Mr. Frederick W. Dohrmann became involved. He was a German immigrant who had come to the S.F. Bay Area in 1860 and had proven himself successful in flour milling and pottery merchandising. He understood the possibilities of the original department store plan and ended up leading the 1897 merger of the Golden Rule Bazaar and the Emporium into one entity in the space that Adolph Feist had leased. He then brought his son, A.B.C. Dohrmann, in as the president.  The younger Dohrmann built the systems and procedures to allow the different departments to work together. The store quickly became successful under his leadership. He remained President until his death in 1914.

The Emporium suffered major damage in the 1906 earthquake and fire. While the store was being rebuilt, a temporary store was opened on Van Ness Avenue. A new building was built on Market Street. The new building had 775,000 square feet of floor space. It had a glass arcade, a glass dome, solid mahogany fixtures, and a new grocery department. The design was intended to make this store as glamorous as anything found in the East.

In 1927, the Emporium merged with H. C. Capwell & Co. based in Oakland. The new holding company was named Emporium-Capwell. The two different divisions operated independently for years only merging their New York and overseas buying offices. The Emporium started to grow with stores on the San Francisco Peninsula, Santa Clara County, Marin County, and Sonoma County. Capwell’s, on the other hand, opened stores in Alameda County and Contra Costa County.

The Emporium-Capwell company was acquired by Broadway Hale Stores in 1969. This put together Broadway (Southern California), Weinstock’s (Sacramento), Emporium (San Francisco) and Capwell’s (Oakland) into one holding company under the name Carter Hawley Hale Stores (CHH). CHH then went on a major acquisition binge which resulted in significant debt. The company filed for bankruptcy protection in 1991. In 1992, the Zell/Chilmark fund bought CHH and renamed it Broadway Stores as the company emerged from bankruptcy protection. In 1996, Broadway Stores was sold to Federated Department Stores and they closed all the various divisions and either converted the stores to Macy’s, Bloomingdale’s, or sold the facilities.

The downtown San Francisco store has mostly been converted into a Nordstrom’s anchoring the San Francisco Center mall.

What happened???? The Emporium remained a dominant department store chain in the San Francisco Bay Area until the 1970’s. Then Ed Finkelstein and Phil Schlein led a rejuvenated Macy’s organization which took the market by surprise. The new Cellar department and the fashion forward Juniors and Young Mens departments captured the youth and early adult markets. Macy’s also put money into the look of their stores setting them apart from the Emporium which did not have capital available for the stores as the parent company had to service its debt. By the mid-80’s, Macy’s was clearly the dominant player. Because Emporium was a value priced department store chain, they also faced pressure from Mervyn’s which offered better values and more convenience. The explosion of good specialty retailers also took market share. During the construction of BART, the downtown San Francisco store suffered as Market Street was a mess and this drove shoppers to the Union Square area. In the end, it was the recklessness of the parent company that destroyed the Emporium and all the other divisions of CHH.

I knew the Emporium well both as a young customer and later as a competitor. When I was a young child, I came with my parents to shop in San Francisco. Modesto was just 80 miles away, but in those days it was a major trip. We had our car serviced before we made the drive and we stayed in a hotel for three days while we shopped for back to school, Christmas, and for Spring/Summer. Although we shopped in many stores (White House, City of Paris, Macy’s, and Hale’s), the Emporium was the targeted store. Not only did it have the merchandise we could afford, but it was also a grand place to take children. During the holidays the roof had a children’s playground/amusement park. There was a Ferris wheel ride that hung out over the front of the store looking straight down at Market Street. There was also a small Southern Pacific passenger train that kids could ride. (The last time I saw the train it was at model train store in the Sunset District.) In those days, the store had a pet department with live animals which was also a playground for the kids. We usually ate in the mezzanine cafeteria. In the mid-70’s I shopped the Emporium when I worked at Bullock’s in Los Angeles and later when I was at Mervyn’s. In those days you could see a lack of excitement in fashion apparel, a decline in customer service, and, most importantly, a decline in the maintenance of the facilities.

NOTE:  I treasure my memories of this Grand Dame of Retail and hope you will too. Please feel free to leave your memories in the comments section below.

The Emporium – San Francisco – 1904 – Pre Earthquake

Emporium – 1910 – Note Earthquake Reconstruction on Roof Nextdoor

The Emporium – San Francisco – 1910

The Emporium – San Francisco – Holiday Greetings – 1910

The Emporium – 1911

The Emporium – Temporary Store on Van Ness – 1908

Emporium – Entrance Arcade – 1905 – Pre Earthquake

Ekmporium – Entrance Arcade – 1911 – Post Earthquake

Emporium – San Francisco – The Grand Staircase – 1915

The Emporium – Rotunda, Cafe, & Bandstand – 1908 – Pre Earthquake

The Emporium – Bandstand – 1906 – Note Sender’s Comments

Emporium – Rotunda – After Earthquake Reconstruction

Emporium – Pre 1906 – Women’s Cloaks & Suits

The Emporium – Juvenile Section – Pre 1906

The Emporium – Oriental Section – Pre 1906

Emporium – 1912- Cafe – Note Fire Sprinkler System on Ceiling

Emporium – Cafe – 1915

Emporium – 1908 Calendar – Sent from Temporary Store

The Emporium – 1908 Calendar – Sent from Temporary Store

Emporium – Postcard Calendar – 1909 – Sent From Temporary Store

The Emporium – 1920′s – Gloves Trade Card

The Emporium = 1910

The Emporium – 1920′s – Trade Stamp

The Emporium – 1906 After Earthquake and Fire

The Emporium – 1906 – Smoldering Fire

The Emporium – 1906 – After the Fire

The Emporium – 1906 – Another View After the Fire

The Emporium – 1906 – After The Fire Looking Through Former Entrance

Emporium – 1907 – Postcard Envelop Containing Earthquake and Fire Postcards

San Francisco City Hall

Emporium – Panorama of the City of San Francisco After Earthquake and Fire.

Emporium – 1906 Earthquake and Fire Burning the Metropolitain Temple

Emporium – 1906 Fire Destroys Concordia Club

Emporium – 1906 – Ruins of St. Ignatius Cathedral and College

Emporium – 1906 – Earthquake and Fire Refugee Camp

Emporium – 1906 – Refugee Camp in Cemetary

The Emporium – 1906 – The Entrance After Fire and Earthquake

These postcards are from the Plummer & Associates Collection. Please do not copy or reproduce without written permission from John Plummer.

Happy Holidays from Plummer & Associates

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

 

Plummer & Associates, Inc.
P.O. Box 607
New Canaan, Connecticut 06840
(800) 603 9981
www.plummersearch.com

Happy Holidays!

At this time of year we all think of our relationships, friends and family. We also like to review our successes and seek areas for improvement.

2010 has been a better year for all of us involved in retail. Although the economy has a long way to go to fully recover, there are significant signs of improvement indicating that the consumer is spending more. That bodes well for all of us!

At Plummer & Associates our commitment is to do a better job than we have before. During the deepest part of the recession, we spent time re-thinking our business model and how we serve our clients. We have always been proud of our success in recruiting top candidates who excelled with our clients, but we challenged ourselves to work more efficiently and at less expense to our clients. We as a team are proud of what we have accomplished.

We have now added a blog to our website: www.plummersearch.com/blog. Currently this blog covers topics related to talent development and information for candidates. In January, as part of our contribution to the retail industry, the blog will cover the evolution of downtown retailers for the prime period from 1880 to 1960. Our first blog will cover the stores of Southern California and the second will cover Northern California. Over time, we will cover all states and provinces in North America, utilizing our collection of over 10,000 retail store postcards.

For now, we thank you for our relationship and want you to know that we are honored to work with you. We trust we have earned your respect so that we may continue this relationship in 2011.

We wish you the best for the holidays and look forward to being in touch in the New Year.

Sincerely,
John Plummer
Susan Gill
Heidi Plummer
Dina Lokets
Kathy Brooke
And the Plummer & Associates Team

P.S. The Santa buttons above are from our collection representing retail stores in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, and the U.K.

HOW TO MAKE AN IMPRESSION WITH AN EXECUTIVE RECRUITER

Thursday, November 11th, 2010

How to make an impression with an executive recruiter?

Quality recruiters are retained by a client to work for them on specific assignments. Their objective is to find the best talent for their clients. How you work with quality recruiters can lead to a positive or a negative impression of you when you need them when making our next career change. Following are suggestions I recommend for you when dealing with retained recruiters.

Positive Impressions
• Be available and help the recruiter. A recruiter can be a good friend and values your input.
• When your schedule is tight, suggest a time to talk.
• Listen carefully to the position being discussed. If you are not interested, immediately let the consultant know and offer to come up with suggestions of possible candidates or where the consultant might find strong candidates.
• Always have a resume handy. Make sure your resume is accurate and that spelling is correct.
• Look your best when you show up for an interview. Be yourself and show you care.
• When you show up for your interview, make sure you have done research on the client. If it is a retailer, make sure you have visited a store first.

Negative Impressions
• Avoiding contact with the recruiter sends a negative message.
• Avoid being derogative about the client or the position. What is unacceptable to you is always an opportunity for someone else.
• If you are interested, avoid exaggerating your credentials and experience. This information always gets checked in the recruitment process.
• Don’t go around a consultant and directly to the employer
• Avoid missing or being late for your appointments.

Remember…..
Recruiters retained by a client and represent that client. They are bound to a code of ethics which best represents the client. They will keep your information confidential and will work with you to get accurate information on your background to demonstrate to the client why you are an appropriate candidate. The relationship the recruiter and the candidate build is important so the recruiter can best present you.

Some recruiters work on a contingency basis. That means they are not necessarily working with the client on an exclusive basis. They are also not bound to the same code of ethics retained firms follow. As a result, you should be cautious when working with recruiters who are not retained.

You have the right and should ask each recruiter who calls if they are working on a retainer basis.

How Do I Explain A Gap In My Employment History

Monday, October 4th, 2010

 

I often discover a gap in a candidate’s employment history while reviewing their resume. What is surprising is that so many individuals do not know what to do about these employment gaps. Some individuals try to hide it, which is lying. Others try to stumble through an explanation which makes an employer suspicious.

There are many reasons for a gap in your employment history. These could be:

  • Your employer went out of business leaving you looking for employment.
  • Your employer terminated your employment due to a staff reduction.
  • Your employer terminated you for cause.
  • Or, you quit.

 

Any of these reasons could leave you with an employment gap while you were looking for a new career. Sometimes, the gap is longer because of an economic downturn or because your family did not want to relocate.

What ever the reason, you should show the employment gap on your resume and be ready to fully explain what you were doing during that time. If you do not have a prepared and honest explanation it will lead prospective employers to think that something else was going on in your life … maybe incarceration.

The last thing you want to do is cover up an employment gap. If your perspective or, worse yet, your new employer finds out about the cover up, you will most likely be not hired, or terminated. Now, it is too easy for employers to verify accurate dates of employment; and, employers do check.

Honesty is the best explanation. An example of a good explanation is ….” after I left company xyz, I started looking for opportunities in my city. Unfortunately, there are no other retailers there so I tried to transfer my skills to another industry. My son/daughter was in his/her senior year in high school so our family made a choice not to relocate. A year later, I found myself still looking. With my son graduating, our family has now agreed to relocate.”

There are many other reasons. Do your best to honestly explain the situation.

Retail Careers: Why College Graduates Should Seriously Consider Retail For a Career

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Following is an article on ‘Why College Graduates Should Seriously Consider Retail as a Career’. I published this article earlier in the year. I feel this is timely. I also feel the industry must do more to boost its reputation within the academic community.

Plummer & Associates, a Retail Industry Expert Offers The Following Advice to Students Entering Careers in Retail…

John Plummer, Plummer & Associates

Plummer & Associates, a Retail Industry Expert describes why Retail is now an attractive career for college graduates.

With over 40 years experience in human resources management and search consulting, John Plummer has developed a highly consultative approach to executive recruiting and as a human resources executive, he held senior management positions with major retailers.
John Plummer currently is President, Plummer & Associates, a New Canaan, Connecticut, based boutique executive search consulting firm which specializes in recruiting senior officers for the retail industry. Over the years, he has recruited teams for growth retailers (Staples, Starbucks, 24 Hour Fitness, Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, Hot Topic!, Chipotle, Jamba Juice, Ulta Salon Cosmetics & Fragrances, The North Face, and many more of the retailers) that have changed the retail landscape. Previously, he had served as a human resources executive for divisions of Federated Department Stores, Fedmart*, and Mervyn’s. He graduated with his MBA degree in 1968 from the University of Southern California and also earned his BA in economics from USC.

“Many years ago when I graduated with an MBA degree, I joined Bullock’s Department Stores in Los Angeles where I had already been working on a part-time basis. I quickly heard from Professors and peers that I had made the wrong choice. They said the industry was not sophisticated enough to use my newly learned tools nor would retail offer the challenges needed. Being contrary, I decided to stay. Of course, being paid more than anyone else in his class comforted him a great deal. “
Well, things have changed. Retail is now a highly complex and sophisticated industry offering incredible challenges and the opportunity to put your new skills to work. When John Plummer joined retail, the organizations were primarily run by owning families and few executives were college educated and most were tactical in orientation. Now, the leaders of the top retail organizations are well-educated with over 85 % having college degrees(1) and 23% having MBA degrees(1). As retail continues to grow Plummer & Associates expects the percentage with college degrees will approach 100% and that the percentage with MBA degrees will be close behind.
What has changed….
First, the industry has consolidated from mostly family-owned and managed regional chains into large corporations operating nationwide and globally.
Secondly, these large businesses are in a highly competitive environment and require sophisticated solutions to strengthen the relationship with the consumer, to manage inventories effectively, to effectively utilize operating and capital expenditures, and to build management, systems, and other infrastructure to support growth and to serve the customer.
Thirdly, the industry works in an ever changing environment in which new ways to serve the customer are constantly being invented along with new ways to communicate with the customer. More importantly, the customer base needs to be better understood to seek ways to better serve the targeted customer as well as to understand consumers who could be effectively served and brought into the customer base. E-commerce has become mainstream over the past few years and opportunities through mobile-commerce are just starting to grow. Who knows what the next channel will be.
Fourthly, global growth in retail has been slow to take hold but is now a significant opportunity. For years global retail seemed to be limited to the luxury brands. Now, the food service industry is rapidly expanding on a global basis (examples: McDonalds, Yum!, Starbucks, etc). Mass merchandising is also expanding rapidly with Carrefour having stores worldwide and Wal-Mart, Staples, Best Buy, Costco, and others catching up. This growth demands executives who have the tools to be effective in different cultures with differing ground-rules.
Lastly, the industry is led by executives who know that highly talented executives are required to lead the businesses going forward. These executives have organized the business so that college graduates can quickly assume roles with responsibilities and require intellectual rigor and offer greater satisfaction.
The Opportunities…
Marketing…
Market Research – The industry is learning more about how to target consumer segments and how the company can expand that customer base without negatively impacting on the relationship with the core targeted customer. The opportunities are significant for the individual who knows how to design research and who is able to interpret the information into strategies.
Advertising/Sales Promotion – This was what retail was known for and is still an important role. But, with the growing use of social media the communication with customers is changing dramatically.
Merchandising – This role is constantly evolving. Merchants no longer make decisions based upon ‘gut feel’. In the past the manufacturer had all the customer information. Retailers with sophisticated point-of-sale information now know which products best meet their customer needs. As a result, the merchant is now an interpreter of the research and sales data and is often partnering with the manufacturer in product design, quality control, and costing.
Brand Management- Retailers now know that a nameplate is no longer sufficient and that strong brand management principles are required to be consistently successful and that the brand must be carried out through all marketing materials, the store experience and the e-commerce experience. This requires that marketing be involved in store operations, store design, human resources and all other areas of the enterprise.
Management…
Store Management – Retail is a labor intensive industry regardless if it is in the food service, retail services, grocery, or fashion sectors. The industry will always need executives who can manage people effectively towards meeting customer expectations and to carry out the essence of the brand.
Operations Management – The opportunities in supply chain management are significant. The efficient movement of merchandise is critical to stay competitive.
Store Development – As retailers look for better predictors of success in store locations and store design, executives are needed with sophisticated financial modeling tools, location selection tools, and store design tools. Green tools are also highly important to reduce energy costs and carbon footprints.
Process Improvement – As with any older industry in a new innovative climate, the retail industry now requires executives who can evaluate procedures and processes starting with a fresh pad rather than looking for incremental improvements.
Finance…
Accounting/Reporting – With new financial systems, the size of the accounting and reporting organizations has shrunk but opportunities exist for those who know how to work with and get the most out of financial systems.
Financial Planning & Analysis – Retailers look to the financial organization to provide the analytics and lead in the development of forecasts and budget planning. Opportunities are significant for those with strong analytical tools.
Creating Value –The role of financial executives as teachers and coaches in working with the other functions in the organization to help them understand the financial implications of their decisions is growing in importance.
Corporate Finance – Retailers require financing to support inventories all year and also require financing to support growth.
Information Technology …
Over the past few years systems have been developed for merchandising, supply chain management, financial management, and operations management. Now, systems are being built to better handle channels such as e-commerce, direct marketing, m-commerce, and shop-television. In addition, new communications are being established with social networking and media. This is creating a demand for executives with greater IT knowledge.
Human Resources …
Talent Acquisition… Because retail is people intensive, there is always a need to recruit people. More important, is recruiting top talent with the appropriate skills and style to meet the company’s objectives. Understanding new methodologies to recruit talent through social networking and other new practices, policies, and procedures is increasingly important.
Human Capital Development… Identifying talent within the organization and developing that talent to each individual’s potential is significantly important to the survival of a retailer in supporting growth and achieving brand standards throughout the organization.
Talent Retention… No good retailer can afford to lose good talent. Understanding what causes talent to leave and understanding what it takes to retain top talent is of utmost importance.
Compensation and Benefits… Retail has moved to understanding the importance of talent and retaining top talent. As a result, compensation and benefit plans are needed to provide the best return on investment.
Human Capital is no longer considered an expense. Instead, it creates a major differentiation between one retailer and all others.

Which Industry Segments Offer Opportunities
Food Service – Growth in the food service sector is significant. The best growth opportunities are in quick serve and quick casual. Look at the growth of Starbucks, Yum! (Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, KFC), Chipotle’, Jamba Juice, both in the U.S. and internationally. The opportunities because of this growth are significant. Only the sit down dining sector is experiencing slow growth.
Fashion Specialty – Although the U.S. has been over-stored in fashion, the shake out due to the recession is creating new opportunities for the stronger retailers. In addition, fashion manufacturers are opening company owned retail stores.
Hard-lines Specialty – This sector has faced the most challenges during this recession. Growth has slowed for most hard-lines retailers. The growth opportunities are primarily with Home Depot, Lowes, Dick’s Sporting Goods, AutoZone, Petsmart, and similar operations.
Mass Merchandising – This group consists of Wal-Mart, Target, Carrefour, Costco, Sam’s Club, Metro and similar chains. These are sophisticated and driven retail organizations offering significant opportunities in the U.S. and globally. These retailers are also broadening their customer bases and are expanding their merchandise assortments.
Grocery – The grocery industry was caught off guard with the advent of the warehouse clubs and the entrance of mass merchandisers into the grocery categories. These retailers are fighting back through the development of better operating strategies and marketing strategies. It was just announced that almost 50% of Wal-Mart sales are from the grocery categories. At the same time, new successful concepts such as Trader Joe’s, Aldi, and Whole Foods are growing rapidly.
HBA/Drug – This segment has consolidated heavily down to only a couple of major players who are highly sophisticated. They are also redesigning the business model through the addition of mini health clinics and the addition of third party drug provision services. The innovation in this segment will grow in geometric progression.
Retail Services – This is another major growth category and is a result of consumers need for services provided by a reliable brand. All you need to do is look at the growth of Geek Squad, Jiffy Lube, Jackson – Hewitt Tax Service, California Closets, Aamco, Merry Maids, just to name a few.
E-commerce, catalog, shop television, direct selling, direct marketing, m-mobile – The growth of e-commerce has taken share away from traditional catalog retail and direct selling and direct marketing channels. The emergence of multi-channel strategies and the advent of m-commerce will ensure growth in this broad sector.
New Ventures – This has always been the most exciting part of retail. Just look at the new companies that have developed within the last twenty years into industry dominance. For example, look at Starbucks, Staples, Office Depot, Anthropologie/Urban Outfitters, Amazon, PeaPod, 24 Hour Fitness, Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Geek Squad, Best Buy Mobile, Jamba Juice, Chipotle’ Mexican Grill, and all the other major retailers which have evolved from a twinkle in the eye to powerhouses.
What is the most rewarding factor?
The most important feed back an executive finds in the retail industry is the customer’s response to new actions and strategies. Regardless of whether you run an entire retail organization or just a small market, you can quickly see the results of your activities. This inspires self-confidence and drives your ambition to do and try more. Nothing builds esteem like seeing your success!
How to investigate a career in retail?
Check with your placement office for when a retailer will be interviewing at your school. If retailers are not interviewing at your school, I strongly recommend you contact the senior human resources executive at the retailer you are interested in joining. A letter to that executive will get you considered for the company’s executive development program. You may find a position at a local branch at a major chain, but that usually will not offer you the opportunity to quickly move into a decision making role.
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